This Week in Women

Rock the Street, Wall Street and founder Maura Cunningham Featured on the TODAY Show

Rock the Street, Wall Street, a program founded by Maura Cunningham, is inspiring young girls across the country to embrace their interest in math. NBC’s Savannah Sellers sat down with Cunningham to learn more about the her mission to provide mentorship and real-life skills.

XYPN Pledges 50-50 Gender Ratio, Then Hires Two New Female Executives

Brooke Southall for RIABiz

Blair here: Check out the horrifying comment section.

“If we always hired for experience, you’d always hire old, white dudes,” he (Alan Moore) says.

This All Women’s Super Bowl Ad is helping close the STEM Gender Gap

Renee Morad for NBC News

To pay homage to women in STEM who are paving the way for future generations, skincare brand Olay is launching a Super Bowl commercial with their #MakeSpaceForWomen campaign.

From left to right: Retired astronaut Nicole Stott, actresses Lilly Singh, and Busy Phillips are starting in an Olay commercial that will air during the Super Bowl on Sunday.Courtesy of Olay.

 

5 Ways to Bring More Women in to Asset Management

Ginger Szala for ThinkAdvisor

Women manage only 2% of all assets, and the proportion of female portfolio managers fell to 9% from 10% between 2009 to 2015 — despite the fact that women managers outperform their male counterparts, according to Morningstar. What explains this situation?

A new book dives into this research (while being immensely readable): “Smart(er) Investing: How Academic Insights Propel the Savvy Investor,” by Elisabetta Basilico of Applied Quantitative Analysis and Tommi Johnsen of the University of Denver’s Reiman School of Finance (Palgrave MacMillian).

Top Women in Wealth Tech for 2020

Janet Levaux for ThinkAdvisor

A poll of nearly 50 fintech companies conducted by event producer LendIt in 2018 found that the average percentage of women employed at these firms was 37%, while the figure of women in the C-Suite was only 19%. Plus, the department with the most female talent was marketing; engineer/product had the least female talent.

2 Ways FINRA Can Make the Industry Safer for Women

Sonya Dreizler for Financial Planning

I suspect there’s correlation between brokers who sexually harass their colleagues and brokers that commit ethical lapses when it comes to serving clients; but we can’t know for sure unless FINRA releases that data publicly.

 

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